Why does my child feel like he or she’s a freak?

Why does my child feel like he or she’s a freak?

Posted February 05, 2019 05:03:33 In the summer of 2018, a 10-year-old girl in South Africa was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

It was a shock, but a diagnosis that would change her life forever.

After a short stay at a local mental hospital, the girl was transferred to the Children’s Hospital in Cape Town.

For six months, she was the only person in the world she knew who could talk.

It would take several months for her to learn the language, understand the rules of the hospital and even get used to her new surroundings.

The story of how she came to be diagnosed with ASD was told in an interview that was published in the April 2018 issue of the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

It was the story of a young girl who was determined to find out the truth behind her condition and who believed in her innocence.

The interview was written by Dr. Rakesh Srinivasan, a pediatrician who works with children with autism.

Dr. Srinasan is an internationally renowned pediatrician with a special interest in autism.

He has been a child psychiatrist for over 20 years and has been working with children and adolescents with autism for over a decade.

In his interview with the British Journal of Psychiatry, Dr. Sranasan revealed the reasons behind his diagnosis of autism.

His mother is a former nurse and he told the British journal that his mother was the one who started him on the autism journey.

“I can tell you that my mother and I did not have any connection with the medical profession or the mental health profession at all.

I was born with autism,” he said.

Dr Srin as well as his mother, were both very poor and had little education.

“At one time, I was the youngest child of two families and a single parent,” he explained.

“So when I was very young, my parents didn’t have much money, so my mother used to buy me clothes from the market.”

“So I think that my autism is a consequence of my mother not being able to provide for my needs, and she didn’t want to raise me because she was afraid of my father.

She didn’t know how to raise a child,” he continued.

Dr Rakeshed Srinivans diagnosis is a sign of his parents poverty, but the diagnosis also has a social history.

His parents lived in poverty for almost their entire lives, his father working as a labourer.

In his interview, Dr Srin says his father had no income and had to rely on his mother to feed him.

The child was born in the same house that his parents lived.

His father died a year after he was born.

His mother had a much harder time financially.

“She worked two jobs to support her children and her husband and it was difficult for her,” Dr Sran as he told BBC News.

“The whole family was struggling financially.”

Dr Sran says his diagnosis also comes with a long history.

“As a child, my mother never took me to school, she did not let me play with the friends and my brother would often beat me,” he added.

Dr Sreenasan explains that he had never felt like he was different, and that he always felt like a freak, but it was always something he was afraid about.

His diagnosis also took him on a journey.

“The diagnosis came with a lot of questions and the fact that I had autism means that there are a lot more questions I have to answer to myself about the condition,” Dr. Toni said.

“As a parent, you have to do your best to answer these questions and to keep yourself safe.

You have to know what you can do, so that you can find your answers,” he concluded.

Dr Toni Srin is the founder and CEO of Emotional Development Centre (EDC) in South African’s Durban, where she works with families with autism who are in the care of her team.

She is also the executive director of the South African Autism Association and a member of the Autism Association of the United States (AAUS).

“In South Africa, people are often misdiagnosed with autism, they don’t have the information, they are not well educated,” Dr Toni told BBC World Service’s Inside Matters.

“They are not in the right place at the right time.”

Dr. Toni Srin said the best way to help children is by giving them the right support.

“If you can give your child a positive attitude, they can thrive.

If they have a good relationship with their parents, they will find it easier to cope,” she added.

Dr Hilda Srin has worked with children diagnosed with an autism spectrum condition for over twenty years.

She told BBC that the best support for parents and children is through education.

“I don’t think you can help a child if you don’t know where they are at and what their strengths are,” she explained.In